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Marilee J. Layman

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06:00 pm: The Help by Kathryn Stockett

I tried to post this yesterday, but everything on LJ was circularly connecting so I saved it in a file.

I have this book way down in my pile of papers and when I saw it was being discussed at a different library, I looked at the library's site and found not only were all the books out, but the list was 12 more people waiting. I got mine from Amazon. I headed out to one of the large libraries in the county. I'd put in a request for The Warmth of Other Suns and got it. One of our librarians at the regular library had been promoted to this one and we talked for a bit.

I went in and sat by myself for a bit, but then the librarian came in. She warned me that this group used to meet in a home and one of those women would still be in charge. My librarian/fan/leader tells us that our SF club has the most attendees. Well, tonight we had 12, which is about the SF club's top, but six of us were new. The leader seemed upset when I told her that I didn't want to read The Postmistress or a bio of Pearl Buck. I don't know how many others will go again. I got home and have been online.

This is a story of a town in Mississippi in the 1960s, with three major characters: Aibileene, Minny (both black maids) and Skeeter, a white woman. There was still strong segregation in the town, and many of the black women work as maids for the wealthy women. Skeeter comes home from college and wants to be a journalist. She runs into one of the maids and gets her story. They agree that they want to write a book with a chapter for each maid that would get involved and turn it in to a publisher.

There's a lot of bad feeling between the races and between the maids and their ladies. A point comes where a number of the maids decide to help and Skeeter has to write like crazy to get it to the publisher in time. Gura gur obbx vf choyvfurq naq erchoyvfurq. Fxrrgre trgf n wbo ng Unecre Pbyyvaf va ALP, naq gur gjb znvqf obgu trg orggre yvirf.

I really liked this, but right now I find myself reading a lot of books about that era -- there's more in my list.

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