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Marilee J. Layman

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09:42 am: News from 9/8 WashPost

The Food section got six awards from the Association of Food Journalists, and the column I like best -- Cooking for One by Joe Yonan, published monthly -- came in third for Best Newspaper Food Column. I used to cut recipes down to one serving a lot before I got sick, but he has some interesting ideas and I can actually do about a quarter of them if I plan and can stand up while the ingredients are still good and so forth.

Also in the Food section, they had an article and lots of recipes on canning. I don't know about pickled grapes, but some of the others sounded good. They set up a food exchange, so you come with yours and swap with others and get different canned food.

In poor third-world cities, they can manage saving money by using a cellphone to get money to a bank. A village can use a single cellphone and each person just swaps their sim in for access. Fascinating article about how technology helps move people forward.

When you think about it, you know there must be old people in prison, but Virginia now has a geriatric ward in a prison. The elderly, weak, incompetent prisoners are cared for by other younger prisoners for pennies an hour. Virginia rarely lets violent prisoners out even when they can legally have parole, but doesn't it seem that a guy who needs a wheelchair should be with his family or a nursing home?

One of the op-ed columnists had a column about how the Democrats and Republicans fight. The column is titled Democats and Republicanines. Took me a second look.

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Comments

[User Picture]
From:redbird
Date:September 9th, 2010 05:01 pm (UTC)
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I don't think age or even disability should be an automatic reason for parole, for a couple of reasons. The first is that it becomes an out for people who hide their crimes (or hide from the police) long enough. There's a tendency in that direction already, judges who think that imprisoning a 40-year old for 40 years is reasonable but imprisoning a 75-year-old for 4 is not, even though the older person will be released at a younger age.

Related to that, with such a policy, what do you do if a disabled person commits a serious crime?
[User Picture]
From:mjlayman
Date:September 9th, 2010 05:11 pm (UTC)
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I don't think it should be automatic, but I think they should consider it. If a disabled person commits a serious crime, they should go to jail. But they should be given more directed consideration when their time comes up for parole.

Virginia gives the lowest percentage of parole for prisoners that did serious crimes of all the states.
[User Picture]
From:redbird
Date:September 10th, 2010 12:42 am (UTC)
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That's an argument for reforming the Virginia prison system for everyone, I think, not only for elderly or disabled prisoners.
[User Picture]
From:mjlayman
Date:September 10th, 2010 05:06 pm (UTC)
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Oh, sure. We have rotten prisons and the death penalty, too. But that prison has a number of unconscious and demented (most Alzheimer's) patients and keeping them in the infirmary (former basketball court) is not actually punishing them. They should be able to go to a nursing home where there will be better-trained staff.
[User Picture]
From:mjlayman
Date:September 12th, 2010 08:49 pm (UTC)
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A letter to the editor yesterday thinks the wrong people are being punished.
[User Picture]
From:mjlayman
Date:September 15th, 2010 08:12 pm (UTC)
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Another letter printed in the editorial region but originally posted in a blog with the title Virginia's elderly prisoners: Set them free
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