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Marilee J. Layman

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06:23 pm: Windy and Rainy
We're back to cold and rain and wind. It might get to 70 by the end of the week, but the 50s before that.

Last night I managed to turn out the light at 4am and slept a bit but woke up at 6am, which is when I can take acetaminophen, so I did. My stomach was rumbling, too, so I came out and made toast with cheese. Spirit sat on my lap while I ate and I gave her a couple of narrow pieces I cut for her. I went back to bed and got up about 1:45pm, which is much better than yesterday.

The Virginia Board of Corrections is keeping their non-descrimination policy even though our AG is upset again.

Yesterday's WashPost had an article on modern vs. traditional homes and the illo has a very modern home. He talks about why people like traditional houses -- they's traditional. Well, when we transferred to NoVA, I was shocked. Those all-brick two-story flat-face houses and offices and so forth seemed scary, as if they were looming over us and didn't want us to be near them.

Back in the places we lived near Seattle, "traditional" was one-story, maybe some brick on the front, but mostly siding. It was much friendlier.

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[User Picture]
From:ritaxis
Date:March 28th, 2010 11:09 pm (UTC)
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I don't even know what he means by "traditional" homes. The houses being built today are utterly unlike the houses I grew up in, or the older houses around here. Everything is different -- the floor plans, the amenities, the proportions, the details. I just don't even have a clue what he thinks is traditional about them.

Now, I live in a house I consider to be traditional -- it's over a hundred years old, has a hip roof and a porch and a lean-to addition with a clawfoot tub in the bathroom, lacks a dining room, has small rooms and high ceilings, gracile proportions and no ornamentation. It's built high to avoid floods, and it has a dooryard and a shed. But it's nothing like an open-plan modern house with a dining room, a foyer, a family room, a den, three bedrooms and two and a half baths.

And what does he mean by modern? Courboisier? There's a lot more to modern design sensibilities than that, and I bet if you came up with a checklist of modern design elements, you'd find that the houses he's calling "traditional" have more than half the elements on the list.

[User Picture]
From:mjlayman
Date:March 28th, 2010 11:20 pm (UTC)
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Well, if you click through and see the illo, you'll see the kind of brick house that is absolutely standard in the DC area. The modern house in the illo is not so common, but there are other houses that are modern, just not very many of them.

Now, I wouldn't call your open-plan house modern because we have those here, too, just in those brick houses.
[User Picture]
From:capemaynuts
Date:March 29th, 2010 01:16 pm (UTC)
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I think one of the reasons people like traditional homes. They are easier to renovate then 'modern' homes. Contractors know where everything should be and know how to make the changes a homeowner wants. Modern homes require an architect to make changes and you need to have blue prints to know where everything goes.
My home started out as a small 2 bedroom bungalow with a detached garage. The previous owners made 4 additions over a 53 year period. So now the house is a 4 bedroom sprawling one level house that doesn't fit any traditional floor plans. But because the root of the house is the bungalow, any contractor (or my hubby) can figure out how to renovate things.
[User Picture]
From:mjlayman
Date:March 29th, 2010 10:22 pm (UTC)
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I think most renovations require blueprints. At least in my city, you have to have them to get the permit.
[User Picture]
From:capemaynuts
Date:March 30th, 2010 12:21 am (UTC)
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Depends on the town. If you are gutting and redoing a bathroom or kitchen, you only need the floor plans of the room you are working on. (And maybe not even that) Try renovating a modern house and you will need the original blueprints to figure out how to make any changes.
If you are changing the actual shape of the house, as in adding additions, you might need blue prints. But they can be made by the contractor if he has any drafting skills. I don't think my parents ever had actual blue prints to their house and they have been living there for 39 years and have done several renovations, including raising the back half of the roof.
I've had to get my share of permits over the years. When we changed the fencing I had to bring in the survey drawing we received when we bought the house. But that was just to prove that there was a fence there already and we were just planning to make it all the same height.
[User Picture]
From:mjlayman
Date:March 30th, 2010 12:31 am (UTC)
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Here, the only thing you don't have to have blueprints for is when you're replacing something with something primarily equivalent, like your fence. I didn't have to get a permit, using blueprints, when I replaced the wood ramp with a concrete one.
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