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Marilee J. Layman

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05:19 pm: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005)
This is a remake of the original movie and I thought Jim Carrey Johnny Depp did pretty well (it's bad when I can't remember the difference between the two). Like the original, five children get special tickets to tour the factory and the four that are not Charlie are all narcissistic. As they go through the factory, each of the bad kids get affected by their problems and their parents go to find them. At the end, there's just Charlie and his grandfather (who worked for Willy Wonka years before) and Willy wants Charlie to take over the factory but he'll never see his parents again. Charlie gives up the factory rather than giving up his family, and they work things out.

I thought using the same actor for the Oompa Loompas was really stupid, but I liked the homage to 2001. I thought it was cute, had more depth than the original, but I don't expect to watch it again.

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[User Picture]
From:dragonet2
Date:November 30th, 2009 10:58 pm (UTC)

Johnny Depp

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The DVD is in the rack by my computer...

Though he was more over the top than Jim Carrey is in some things.

And I felt this movie was closer to the book's original intent than the Gene Wilder one.
[User Picture]
From:mjlayman
Date:November 30th, 2009 11:00 pm (UTC)

Re: Johnny Depp

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Oops. Well, that explains why I liked the character better, because I don't really like Jim Carrey. I'll fix that in the main note.
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From:coyotegoth
Date:November 30th, 2009 11:22 pm (UTC)
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I found the original version to handle a dramatic issue better: in the book, Charlie never really makes a decision of any kind- he keeps his head down, and wins because the other kids are all nastier and greedier. In the '71 movie, Charlie makes mistakes (stealing the Fizzy Lifting drinks), and makes a difficult choice: he decides not to sell Slugworth the Everlasting Gobstopper, even though Wonka has just thrown him out. In short, he becomes a protagonist; in this version, I miss that.
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