?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Marilee J. Layman

Previous Entry Share Next Entry
04:05 pm: "Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day: The Discovery That Revolutionizes Home Baking"
This was first mentioned on Making Light and the idea of making bread sounded good so I put my name on the Hold queueueueue at the library. I got a copy on Friday and my friend the librarian (leader of our SF bookgroup) brought it on the way home from work Sunday and I skimmed it yesterday.

Their theory is that you make very wet refrigerated dough (like Pillsbury?) and it will last for two weeks. You just pull off a bit, shape it, and bake it every morning. However, they don't count the cooking time. There's a lot more complicated breads, but my primary problem is that it requires a lot of equipment plus using a full-size oven. I don't use the oven because it's too dangerous for me to lean over the door of something that hot.

I think you would have to really be into making your own bread to want to use these recipes.

Tags:

Comments

[User Picture]
From:skylarker
Date:April 7th, 2009 08:17 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I tried making some of this, and found the results a bit too dense for my liking - I love home-made challah, but haven't taken the time to make any in years.
From:ex_serenejo
Date:April 7th, 2009 08:24 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I prefer the New York Times method of no-knead bread, but I do the Artisan-in-5-minutes a lot, too, and like it. But yeah, it really does require a very hot oven. We love the bread that results, though.
[User Picture]
From:firecat
Date:April 8th, 2009 06:45 am (UTC)
(Link)
Is acquiring a bread machine an option?
[User Picture]
From:heleninwales
Date:April 8th, 2009 12:34 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I was going to suggest a bread machine. They're easy to use, make a perfectly decent loaf and are much safer than a normal oven.

Because I can't eat a large loaf fast enough, I freeze half to stop it going stale and mouldy.
[User Picture]
From:mjlayman
Date:April 8th, 2009 05:15 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I had a bread machine, but didn't use it enough. I was just curious about this recipe.
[User Picture]
From:mjlayman
Date:April 8th, 2009 05:15 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I used to have a bread machine, but I didn't use it enough and gave it away. I was thinking that the basic recipe from this book was easier than it is, and that I could make it in the toaster oven, which is where I cook most things. It's not a big deal, I buy a bread that I like and lasts a week.
From:(Anonymous)
Date:April 9th, 2009 03:56 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I actually bought the book after getting it from the library because the reviews sounded good, I liked what I read and, besides, I like home made bread. I've now had it for about 6 months and haven't used it yet. Shame on me. I do, however, use my breadmachine very regularly. Justed realized yesterday that I worked my way through 15 lbs. of bread flour (and a bit of rye and whole wheat). I supply a friend with fresh bread regularly and we haven't bought any since I started baking again. It's a good thing - as Martha Stewart would say :-)
Doris
P.S. I will have to try bread using this book, though.
From:(Anonymous)
Date:April 9th, 2009 08:14 pm (UTC)

try the bread

(Link)
Hi Marilee. I made a loaf of the bread you are talking about from the recipe found at this link http://alexandracooks.blogspot.com/2008/06/artisan-bread-in-five-minutes-day.html. I cut the recipe by 1/3 and baked it in a toaster oven. You just have to make sure that your toaster oven will accommodate the size loaf you pull off. I baked mine on aluminum foil I sprayed with Pam and it worked wonderfully. I will say that the later loaves from the same batch tasted better than the first one.

Karen
[User Picture]
From:mjlayman
Date:April 9th, 2009 08:37 pm (UTC)

Re: try the bread

(Link)
The book was very serious about having a stone base and a wood shovel-thing and I couldn't find anything in toaster-oven size. If it comes out fine on foil, I may try it. Thanks!
Powered by LiveJournal.com